What Is Bitcoin And How Bitcoin Works?

What Is Bitcoin

Small wonder that Bitcoin emerged in 2008 just after Occupy Wall Street accused big banks of misusing borrowers’ money, duping clients, rigging the system, and charging boggling fees. Bitcoin pioneers wanted to put the seller in charge, eliminate the middleman, cancel interest fees, and make transactions transparent, to hack corruption, create organic network value, and cut fees. They created a decentralized system, where you could control your money and know what was going on without depending on banks.

Bitcoin has come far in a relatively short time. All over the world, companies, from REEDS Jewellers, a large jewellery chain in the US, to a private hospital in Warsaw, Poland, accept its currency. Billion-dollar businesses such as Dell, Expedia, PayPal, and Microsoft do, too. Websites promote it, publications such as Bitcoin Magazine publish its news and price actions, forums discuss cryptocurrency and trade its coins. It has its application programming interface (API), price index, and exchange rate.

How Bitcoin Works?

How Bitcoin Works?

At its simplest, Bitcoin is either virtual currency or reference to the technology. You can make transactions by check, wiring, or cash. You can also use Bitcoin (or BTC), where you refer the purchaser to your signature, which is a long line of security code encrypted with 16 distinct symbols. The purchaser decodes the code with his smartphone to get your cryptocurrency. Put another way; cryptocurrency is an exchange of digital information that allows you to buy or sell goods and services. The transaction gains its security and trust by running on a peer-to-peer computer network that is similar to Skype, or BitTorrent, a file-sharing system. Satoshi Nakamoto leveraged blockchain technology to allow bitcoin to gain decentralization, complete transparency, and immutability.

Without getting into the technical details, Bitcoin works on a vast public ledger, also called a blockchain, where all confirmed transactions are included as so-called ‘blocks.’ As each block enters the system, it is broadcast to the peer-to-peer computer network of users for validation. In this way, all users are aware of each transaction, which prevents stealing and double-spending, where someone spends the same currency twice. The process also helps blockchain users trust the system.